Serendipity

Méabh, 17, from Ireland.

justachipontimesshoulder:

This movie breaks my fucking heart 

(Source: karenswalker, via hippofoliage)

jellybabiesandjammiedodgers:

so i’m watching some idiot show on syfy about nerd weddings

and there’s this woman going on about how she wants a GoT themed wedding

and i’m just like

are you sure

are you really sure about that

(via turtleminimus)


"She didn’t find it a breeze at all. She was challenged, and at times she found it tough, but she had courage and determination. What emerged was an actress of imagination and real instinct."- Annie Tyson on Emilia Clarke.

"She didn’t find it a breeze at all. She was challenged, and at times she found it tough, but she had courage and determination. What emerged was an actress of imagination and real instinct."- Annie Tyson on Emilia Clarke.

(Source: ygrltte, via awjoffrey)

So I watched “Lilo & Stitch” like two days ago and I couldn’t help but feel like this movie is ridiculously underrated! I know everyone is talking about how “Frozen” is amazing for breaking stereotypes of previous Disney movies and what it means to have a family/sister, but honestly I, personally feel like “Lilo & Stitch” does all of that and more. Don’t get me wrong, I loved,loved,loved Frozen and it is animated so beautifully, but that aside, when you but those two movies together and compare them, for me, “Lilo & Stitch” comes out on top.

So I watched “Lilo & Stitch” like two days ago and I couldn’t help but feel like this movie is ridiculously underrated! I know everyone is talking about how “Frozen” is amazing for breaking stereotypes of previous Disney movies and what it means to have a family/sister, but honestly I, personally feel like “Lilo & Stitch” does all of that and more. Don’t get me wrong, I loved,loved,loved Frozen and it is animated so beautifully, but that aside, when you but those two movies together and compare them, for me, “Lilo & Stitch” comes out on top.

rachelsuggs:

A few things from the Instagram that never made it to the blog

(via hippofoliage)

possum-of-lannister:

anneboleyns:

anneboleyns:

these stills of joffrey look like someone just said something really offensive

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(via awjoffrey)

flawlessirishprince:

mannyhally He’s grand, like.

flawlessirishprince:

mannyhally He’s grand, like.

(via awjoffrey)

(Source: bobbycaputo, via alexcopeman)

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

(via pixarismylife)

jamescookjr:

“When I was auditioning for Joffrey. I only had one audition, and the producers and writers were laughing at my performance because I was being so snotty and arrogant. They found it comical. I thought that was good.” —Jack Gleeson

“Jack is gorgeous – a wonderfully sensitive, quiet, intelligent scholar. He’s the antithesis of that character.” —Michelle Fairley

"Jack, who plays Joffrey is such a lovely fellow." --Ian McElhinney

“He’s this really contemplative, erudite, really gorgeous, generous human being, and he plays Joffrey so well.  It’s very disturbing.” —Natalie Dormer

"Jack Gleeson, who plays Joffrey is an absolute sweetheart in real life, you know what I mean. He’s such a brilliant actor. I think he’s a genius." —Mark Addy

“He’s the most polite, lovely, intelligent person in the whole cast! He’s just so humble and everyone loves him. There’s nothing anyone can say bad about Jack. He literally just turns it on. As soon as they go, “Action!” he goes from lovely Jack to the most sadistic, horrible creep on television.” —Sophie Turner

“Jack Gleeson is really a very nice young man, charming and friendly.” —George R.R. Martin

"I kind of wish he would do more television interviews so that people can see what he’s really like, because there is so much hate for Joffrey, I feel protective of Jack now. If I were him, I’d be petrified that people would come up and slap me on the street! I should be his bodyguard." —Sophie Turner

"Jack is actually a very sweet boy and very bright, very intelligent young man with a natural talent." —Charles Dance

"Jack! He’s the coolest. He smokes a pipe, people. Talk about great acting for somebody who’s so different from the part he plays. I love that guy." —Peter Dinklage

(via awjoffrey)